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Glen R. Leymaster, M.D. 



Dean 1964- 



Marion Fay, Ph.D. 



Acting Dean 1943-1946; Dean 1947-1963 







Margaret D. Craighill, M.D. 

Dean 1940-1946 
-Leave— 1943-1946 



Martha Tracy, M.D. 



Dean 1917-1940 




Rachel Bodley, M.D. 



Dean 1874-1888 




( Lara Marshall, M.D. 



Dean 1888-1917 





I A TRI AN 




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"He that publishes a book runs a very great hazard, since nothing can be 
more impossible than to compose one that may secure the approbation of 
every reader." — Cervantes. 

The editors are well aware of this hazard. We only hope that this publica- 
tion will serve to recall the people and events that were instrumental in 
starting our medical education. To include everyone and everything that 
helped to grant us the privilege of becoming a doctor is beyond the scope of 
any book. Each of us has her own wealth of experiences that will always be 
with her — and only a very few can be shared with others. We all can share 
the emotion of our own first black bag; the passing of the National Boards; 
the mixed emotion of hearing yourself paged for the first time. But none of 
us can really share or explain all the happenings that had to occur to make 
us become doctors. There are too many and they are too private. They 
involve parents, teachers and the patients. The editors hope this book will 
enable you to look at a picture or read a name and say "I remember — ". 
And with that remembering have a renewal of each happy and meaningful 







l'r,fr. 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 



Editor 
Assistants 



Margaret Gallagher 
Rose Miketta 
Barbara Starred 
Clare Siu 
Marsha Wolf son 
Marilyn Ross 





Senior Photos 
Publisher 



Zamsky Studios 
Wm. J. Keller Inc. 




DEDICATION 




Miss Ida Draeger 



Librarian 



We, the class of 1969, gratefully dedicate this year's edition of the IATRIAN to 
Miss Ida Draeger and her staff. Working under impossible conditions; lack of 
space, noise, a small budget, demanding students and faculty; Miss Draeger and 
her staff have always responded with cheerfulness and genuine concern. A seem- 
ingly impossible task is made possible and performed with proficiency and effi- 
ciency by these women. We are proud and grateful to each and all of them. 

In 1963 Miss Draeger was given an award by W.M.C. for 25 years of service, 
and it was said at that time, that generations of students have profitted from her 
calm and helpful administration of the library. She has added six years to that 
service with the same helpful administration. She has been a loyal member of the 
Medical Library Association and has served on many committees of that organ- 
ization. Miss Draeger received a B.S. in Education from the University of Penn- 
sylvania; a B.S. in Library Science from Drexel Institute and worked as a library 
assistant at the University of Penna. before coming to WMC. She belongs to Pi 
Lambda Theta, the Medical Library Association, the Special Libraries Associa- 
tion, and the Association American Medical Colleges. She has served on the 
Committee on Interlibrary Loans; was the Chairman of Committee on Criteria for 
Medical School Libraries; served on the Subcommittee on Recruitment, and was 
Chairman, Medical Library Association, Philadelphia Regional Group. She has 
published several papers and is listed in the Who's Who of American Women. 
She is a very active member of the Pilgrim Baptist Church in Cheltenham. 




r 



"To study the phenomena of disease without books is to sail an 
uncharted sea, while to study books without patients is not to go to 
sea at all." — Sir Wm. Osier. We students at WMC have never had 
to do without books or journals, and most important, have never 
had to do without an answer to any request made at any of the staff 
of our library. The facilities were hot in the summer, cold in the 
winter, and noisy and crowded most of the time, but somehow, that 
is not what the class of '69 will remember. We will only remember 
a staff of dedicated women, working under impossible conditions 
and doing an impossible job in such a way that we will graduate 
proud of our library — just because of the staff and the job they have 
done. 



Miss Pauline Johnson, Librarian 








Mrs. Violet Heber 



Mrs. Beatrice Jenkinson 



Miss Beatrice Rymshaw 




25 year Faculty— 1963 



Dr. C. Thomas. Dean M. Fay. Dr. L. Winston. Miss Draeger 



ADMINISTRATION 




Glen R. Leymaster, M.D. 



President and Dean 



TO THE SENIORS: 

GRADUATION will soon be here, and you will be marching forward to claim 
your diploma. You will know then that the title "Doctor" is rightfully yours, at 
long last. Honor that title, and wear it proudly. 

All of us — your teachers, members of the Board, the Administrative Staff — 
congratulate you. We are proud of you and confident that you will continue to 
grow in competence in your chosen profession. 

To each graduate, our best wishes for a successful career. 

Glen R. Leymaster, M.D. 
President and Dean 




1967 




In 1964, upon assuming his post as Dean and President of 
WMC, Dr. Glen Leymaster felt that he had to make one of 
two choices; either to turn the College into a coeducational 
school, or to justify it on its own terms. Dr. Leymaster 
chose the latter. In describing the premise behind the 
changes he hoped to institute, he states: "While there can 
be no compromise witth quality, there can be variation 
among medical schools in relative emphasis among disci- 
plines. All branches of medicine must be open to individual 
students, but a medical school with a unique student body 
ought to have unusual strength in some areas and thus pro- 
vide unusual opportunities for its students." (J. Amcr. Med. 
Worn. Ass. 20, no. 4 (1965):347) (Women in Medicine, 
by C. Lopate) 



In 1967, at one of our Dean's Hours, Dr. Leymaster re- 
ported meetings and discussions with the State Legislature 
where our admissions policy had been discussed and he said 
to us, among many cheers, that he felt that as long as he 
was Dean, it was to remain the Woman's Medical College. 



In 1968, we the students, the Alumnae and others, received 
a letter which stated, "In keeping with the spirit of the 
times it seems appropriate for the Woman's Medical College 
periodically to re-examine its admissions policy. With the 
concurrence of the Board of Corporators and Dr. Leymas- 
ter, and with the desire in mind of advancing the best inter- 
est of the College, an Advisory Committee on Admission 
Policies has therefore recently been appointed. This Com- 
mittee has been asked to recommend to the Board and to 
the President whether our goal of providing the highest 
quality medical education obtainable is best realized by re- 
maining open only to women — ". 



1968 




1970 




Mary Ellen Hartman, M.D., Associate Dean 





Marvin R. Dunn, M.D., Associate Dean 

Claude Bernard said " — vital forces directs phe- 
nomena which it does not produce; physical agen- 
cies produce phenomena which they do not di- 
rect." These administrators could be likened to the 
vital forces; the students to the phenomena; and 
these administrators' offices could be the physical 
agencies. Through what appears to be mysterious 
ways, these "vital forces" interview, accept, drop 
and graduate students. They arrange curricula, 
schedule classes, arrange loans and scholarships 
and attend committee meetings. Behind their office 
doors, decisions are made, questions are discussed, 
decisions are remade, and all that it takes to ad- 
minister a medical school, is administered. 

*Not pictured — E. Weinberg, M.D., Assistant to 
the Dean, in charge of the Re-Training Program 
for graduates. 

Ethel Weinberg, M.D., Associate Dean 




Charles A. Glanville, Vice-President for Development 



Edward C. Kane, C.P.A., Vice-President and Treasurer 



COLLEGE OFFICE 




Miss Anne Morrisey 





Mrs. Betty Hartkopf Mrs. Betsy Maya 



Alumnae Assoc. 




Mrs. Gladys Scholl 





Mrs. McNinch E. Clayton 



SECRETARIES 
TO THE DEANS 





illillW. 




Miss Ellen Harkins Mrs. Nan Bowers Mrs. Ceil Dowling 



COPY AND 
MAIL ROOM 




Phil O'Connell 



PUBLIC RELATIONS AND PLANNING OFFICES 






n 



Mrs. Frances Husten Mrs. Joyce Tenney Mrs. Catherine Herron Mrs. Pam Marshall 




■ 



/ 



■ 

■ - 




i<^ 



H 



The view from the entrance to the college show 
— and between this, the old original college baling. We have walked the first 
lloor corridor of this connecting link hundreds o( times. All of us have stopped at 
least four times — to pay our tuition. Many of us have stopped other times — to 
pay book bills and — sometimes successfully — other times unsuccessfully — to cash 
checks. Hut there are a lot of other things happening here — personnel — purchas- 
ing — bookkeeping, etc. — all of which must be, to keep a medical school opcrat- 



TREASURER— COMPTROLLER— BURSAR 





Chas. Littleton 




Pat Morris 




Dave Mathis 




Mary Moore 





Bill Steck 



1* , 



J acq. Zenzer 




Each year the President's Report in- 
cludes a Financial Picture. Much of the 
work to make this picture is due to these 
offices. It's a complicated picture, includ- 
nig the assets; such as cash on hand, 
money received from patients, that re- 
ceivable from the State, materials, land, 
buildings and equipment, loans due from 
students, permanent investments, tuition, 
research and training programs, etc. On 
the other hand there is the expenditures; 
such as cost of supplies, banks, mort- 
gage, money owed to endowment funds, 
the cost of education of students, salaries 
of all personnel, and cost of patient care. 
And of course, don't forget the book- 
keeping involved in cashing checks for 
the students and faculty. We, who have 
enough trouble keeping our bank book 
straightened out, can't begin to compre- 
hend the complicated bookkeeping and 
record-keeping handled by these people. 



Lucille Iannitto 



Joan Mitchell 



R. McLaughlin 



PURCHASING 





Everything has a number in our lives to- 
day. And Medical Schools are no excep- 
tion. From paper towels to electron 
microscopes, everything gets a number 
before it is purchased. Here arc the 
number givers, as usual, in triplicate. 



George Brown 



Mrs. R. Kline 



Eliz. McFadden 



PERSONNEL 






Pat Roth 



Kathy Pannula 



Susan Convery 



The ratio of personnel to patient in an 
ideal hospital is 10:1; and in an ideal 
medical school is 6: 1 . These people are 
attempting to maintain that ratio with 
qualified personnel. Applications, inter- 
views, and that usual problem, the turn- 
over rate, occupy their time. 



II 



ANATOMY 



Gross . . . Histology . . . Organology . . . Neuro- . . . 
Genetics . . . Embryology . . . "We are here to co-ordi- 
nate your courses for you" . . . yes, your cadaver is a 
little fat, that's why your instruments keep sliding out 
of your hands . . . Preserve that blood vessel . . . are 
there really only 2,000 more facts to memorize? . . . 
the cortico-spinal tract has 80% crossed fibers, or is it 
75%? ... EPSP . . . IPSP . . . reflexes of all kinds- 
stretch, flexor, extensor . . . inputs, outputs . . . tilt! 
. . . informative slide sessions . . . hilarious lectures . . . 
fun and games . . . good stories . . . facilitate the 
synapse — student rigidity . . . Benzer's 3,000 mutants 
... the missing fly . . . frizzled chickens. The final 
exam seems longer than the whole course! CORRE- 
LATION! 




Maynard Dewey, Ph.D., Chairman 






I 



Andrew Beasley, Sc.D. 



David Williamson, Ph.D. 



Madeline Fusco, Ph.D. 






^ 



* ■ ~ " » 




Marie Diberardino, Ph.D. 



Abraham Kulangara, Ph.D. 



Ronald Irving, Ph.D. 







Alice Savage, Ph.D. Vivian Wilson 



Harriet Stout 



Nancy Hoffner 



Alice Sydlowski Anne Maguire 



12 



PHYSIOLOGY 



Interesting, lucid lectures by Dr. Bohr — learning the 
ultrastructure of oscilliscopes, and then being able to 
repair them — action potentials — high Na+ outside — 
high K+ inside — watching impulses zip right along the 
axon — everywhere frogs, on the table, hopping down 
the halls — Why are the other lab groups' results ap- 
pearing on our screen? — resistance, voltage, current — 
"repeal Ohm's law" — hyperpolarizing — hypopolarizing 
— equilibrium potential — what's a Nerst? If you eat 
200 gm. of fats and add some lipase, then multiply by 
four you gain how much weight? Or should I use the 
Goldman equation here? It all adds up to Physiology. 





David Goldman, Ph.D. 



Lloyd Barr, Ph.D. 





Byung Pal Yu, Ph.D. 



T. Zimmerman, Ph.D. 




"I s § 




Edward Masoro, Ph.D., Chairman 




Fred. DeMartinis. Ph.D. 



George Kaldor, M.D. 




Winfried Burger, M.D. 



Bernard Pennock. Ph.D. 




^R 



Q. S. Hsu, Ph.D. P. Chowraski, Ph.D. N. Kriesman, G.S. S. Steinberg, G.S. Bill Shriver 



F. Wilderman 



13 




Stuart Narrod, Ph.D. 




BIOCHEMISTRY 



Long afternoons spent doing experiments that some- 
times work — watching the sun set over City Line Ave- 
nue — our teachers tried to make the course interesting 
(how interesting can Henderson-Hasselbach be?) — 
learning metabolic pathways inside out, backwards 
and forwards — how to make a protein; how to break a 
protein — lipids, lipids everywhere — all the way with 
RNA — we treat sick E. coli — ATP is the source of 
all — how to synthesize non-essential amino acids in 10 
easy lectures. No resemblance between the exam ques- 
tions and the lecture material — most everyone flunks 
the mid-term — these are general things we remember 
from biochemistry. And last, but not least, don't forget 
to use Harper for the Boards! 





S. Rosenthal, Ph.D. 



D. Hsu, Ph.D. 



A. Berg, Ph.D. 



R.Scorpio, Ph.D. 





F. Covato, G.S. 



Studying for Biochem. Midterm 



Studying for Biochem. Final 



L. Klunk, G.S. F. Cronfone, G.S. E. Reed 







P. Glauser 



M. Weil 



A. Foster 



14 



MICROBIOLOGY 



"Ma Miller" may be gone (though not forgotten) but 
Auntie Maria is bouncing merrily along. The students 
may get the antigens and antibodies mixed with 
haptens and reagins but one thing they do understand 
is the correct way to streak a culture plate. How to 
carry your microscope up and down the second floor 
is also an essential part of the Micro course which is 
mastered but never appreciated. Uncle Ralphie and 
his crew continue to get dry cultures and maintain a 
friendly attitude in spite of it. 



* 




Maria Kirber, Ph.D., Chairman 




.- 



W $ 





Ralph Knight, Ph.D. 



Elaine Whitbeck, Ph.D. 



Herbert Kirber, M.D. 



Mary Turner, Ph.D. 



CLINICAL MICROBIOLOGY 




Rose Kreutle 
Asst. Supr. 



4$ 



L. Kirkpatrick 



M. Nelligan 



D. Taglianeff 



F. Resnick 



B. Ewin 



S. Jeffries 



15 



PHARMACOLOGY 



Goodman and Gilman, Drill and the PDR — these are 
three books we will never forget, because we will never 
stop using them. We were introduced to them by some 
professors we will never forget; Drs. Ellis, Riker, 
Swaine, and Vincent. How much of the chemistry, the 
biological effects, the sites and mechanisms of action 
and the generic names we remember, is a question left 
best unanswered. 




William Riker, M.D., Chairman 






Chas. Winter, Ph.D. 



Herbert Wendel, Ph.D. 



Chas. Swaine, Ph.D. 



Norma Vincent, Ph.D. 




J. McGlynn 




P. Oswald 



/""N 





■dee poqjl 

IS A NO-NO 



J. McGill 




Patsy 



PRO 

Here's to "The Pill" 

The creature divine; 
Permits blooming each month 

But not bearing in nine. 
With it you are able 

To plan numbers (not kind) 
Of children you want 

Without worry or mind. 
CON 
Here's to "The Pill" 

The creature divine; 
Permits blooming each month 

But not bearing in nine. 
It's the only creature 

This side of hell 
Who guarantees pleasure 

And guilt feelings as well. 



16 



PATHOLOGY 

At last a course that mentions diseases and means 
those found in man, not rats or cats or dogs. But, 
remember trying to recall signs, symptoms, gross and 
microscopic of all those diseases for round-up each 
Monday? Speed-reading courses came in handy for 
reading Robbins and Anderson to complement your 
notes. Tranquilizers helped your anxiety neurosis 
about the exams and new glasses helped your eye 
strain from looking at all the slides. And what about 
your first autopsy and CPC? Ours is not to reason 
why, our is to know why people die. 




I. N. Dubin, M.D.C.M., Chairman 





Richard Shuman, M.D.C.M. Stan. Norkin, M.D. 



Tomas Aquino, M.D. 



Jean Forest, M.D. 





Theo. Krouse, M.D. 



Ilmia Bano, M.D. 



Marg. Morales, M.D. 



E. Goebber 




E. Whisner 






E. Drummond 



A. Ballard 



P. Bagby 



E. Goodman 



M. Lott 



17 



CLINICAL 
PATHOLOGY 





fc 



Jennie Cheng, M.D. 



A. Sykes, M.T. 





M. Lee 



R. Penman 






Mary Porter, M.D., Chairman 






E. Newberry W. Owens 



B. Rogers 







L. Williams 




N. Fazzini 



K. Mathis 



B. Fessmire 



D. Forseman E. SchaefTer 



E. Cuklanz 



CANDID CASUALS 






I know it's here somewhere! 



Let me hunt! 



End of an 8 hour scrub! 



18 



STUDENT HEALTH 




Marion Boyd, M.D. 





Alice Devlin, R.N. 



Alice Anderson, M.D. 
No student matriculating through WMC can 
forget the Freshmen physicals. But the impact is 
softened somewhat by these wonderful people who 
did a tremendous job then and have continued to 
do so throughout our years at the college. They 
perform a tiring and thankless task and we shall 
always remember them. They have been our 
friends, our Mothers and most of all, our Physi- 
cians and nurses. We know they will continue to 
do a fine job in the future and hope they will have 
better working areas to do so. 





Judith Mausner, M.D. 




Anita Bahn, Sc.D. 



PREVENTIVE 
MEDICINE 

Principles and Trends in Population and Dis- 
ease, Epidemiology and Biostatistics; Communi- 
cable Diseases and Their Control; Control of En- 
vironmental Factors; Nutrition and Deficiency 
Diseases; Maternal and Child Health; Accident 
Prevention; Adult Health and Chronic Disease; 
Occupational Health; Medical Care Administra- 
tion; Organization and Administration of Com- 
munity Health Services; — would you believe we 
studied all those topics in our four years of Pub- 
lic Health and Preventive Medicine? Well, we 
did! With the great emphasis on the Social Needs 
of our country and the world today, these subjects 
were pertinent and necessary, even though many 
the lecture we skipped or wished we had. The role 
of the physician as counsellor and the impact of 
social problems on the physician were introduced 
to us while in school and will grow in importance 
after we leave school and assume our roles as 
practicing doctors in the community. 




Mrs. Fleck, Dietician 



19 



EMERGENCY ROOM AND CLINIC 








E. Quinn, R.N., Supr. 



Riaz Rana, M.D., Surg. 







John Dempsher, M.D., Med. 



S. Sandors, R.N., Supr. 






A. Damone, R.N. 



D. Klemke, R.N. 



R. Hill, R.N. 



M. Pfeffer, R.N. 






C. Stubblebine, R.N. N. Kearns, R.N. 



N. Madden, R.N. 



F. Williams, LPN 






S. Sommers, LPN 



H. Parker 



J. Howard 



P. Brown 



20 



" — one of the essential qualities of the 
clinician is interest in humanity, for the 
secret of the care of the patient is in car- 
ing for the patient." — Peabody 



M 

E 

D 

I 

C 

I 

N 

E 





"Life is short, the Art long, experience deceptive, 
judgment difficult." (Hippocrates) This is made pain- 
fully aware to the student when he first begins to 
study the subject of medicine. Remember the first his- 
tory you took? And how, when these people pictured 
on these pages, took the same history, either by asking 
different questions or by interpreting answers to the 
same questions with their experience, they came up 
with a different diagnosis (and a lot less R/O's)? In 
medicine is where you learn that if you let the patient 
talk long enough and you listen hard enough, he usu- 
ally tells you what is wrong with him. It is also where 
you learn that the practice of medicine is truly an art 
mixed with science and that the good physician is a 
gifted artist. 



H. Phelps Potter, M.D., Chaiman 




■ 
M. Sones, M.D 





J. Klinghoffer, M.D. 



C. Thomas, M.D., Sc.D. 



J. Urbach, M.D. 






P. Siegel, M.D. 



G. Voci, M.D. 



W. Smith, M.D. 



D. Bartuska, M.D. 






W. Sembrot, M.D. 



D. Goodman, M.D. 



P. Kovnat, M.D. 



R. Vasso, M.D. 



22 



B. Cooper, M.D. C. Guy, M.D. 



M. McDevitt, M.D. A. Yaha, M.D. 



R. G i over, M.D. 




K. Ries, M.D. 




Gastrics can be fun! 





A. Alavi, M.D. 



MM V 

A. Preston, M.D. r. Sahigliogu, M.D. J. Short, M.D. 






Really? White is in! 





'N 




What did the EK.G show? 



£i ffl r, * » ^ 



B. Flaherty r. Murphey L. Cabry 



D. Eshelman K. Wojtowicz M Steele 



23 




Leo Madow, M.D., Chairman 




R. Krause, M.D. 



D. Dorencamp, M.D. 



S. Wenger, M.D. 



K. Goldstein, M.D. 



PSYCHIATRY 

AND 
NEUROLOGY 



We spent the first year in Psychiatry learning the psychoses; 
the second year learning the Neuroses and how to do a 
neurological exam; the third year trying to apply what we 
had learned; and the fourth year, wishing we had tried 
harder in the third year. We've stopped biting our nails 
(oral fixation); stopped being neat (anal fixation); stopped 
thinking of our fathers (Oedipus complex); and most have 
become certain that if we don't get a date soon, we'll all be 
fixed in the latent phase. 







R. Burns, M.D. 



F. Conrad, M.D. 





W. Johnson, M.D. 




N. Lamb, M.D. 



/^ 






R. Stanton, M.D. 



R. Steppacher, M.D. 



C. Blynn, M.D. 



M. Ehland, M.D. 



"First distinguish between organic and non-organic — then 
treat both — as man is not body alone." (MRG) 



24 







-f. 



You want to do a Neurological 
Exam? It's allright with me. 



% • 



No tremor or flap and 
I always wear my clothes 
this way. 




Orientation? My name? 
Where am I? 





That is good muscle tone 
for a kid my age. 



Dysdiodochokinesis? Of 
course mine is perfect! 




Diagnosis? Organic. 




Testing DTR's is okay, but 
those superficial ones 
tickle my belly. 




Nah. inorganic. 



My gait? Of course I can 
walk heel-to-toe. 







Oil i, 



First I'll have to have 
a sleep and awake EEG. 
a I P, a myelogram and a 
three year trial of Dilantoin. 



25 




PHARMACY 



Thousands of prescriptions are filled by 
these dedicated people each year. And 
for each hour taken by just this service, 
there are four to five hours spent on 
bookkeeping procedures. The students 
are sure their most popular item is a pill 
for dysmenorrhea. 



Z&L * " 




H. Goldman, Pharm., Director 



M. Jacques, Pharm., Asst. Dir. 




L. Beaulier, Pharm 




E. Collins 



L. Thompson 



T. Hodge 




26 




FLOW, FLOW. FLOW. THE CURRENT OF LIFE IS EVER ONWARD"— Kobodaishi 



OBSTETRICS 

AND 

GYNECOLOGY 



27 



"Two of the greatest privileges of the physician are to aid in the 
relief of pain and to assist in the miracle of birth " (mrg) 




Elsie Carrington, M.D., Chairman 




A. Taylor, M.D. 



E. Waugh, M.D. 







M. Williams, M.D. E. Laufer, M.D. 





*l»v 




Mary D. Pettit, M.D., Professor 




1 








A. Young, M.D. 



J. Leibfried, M.D. 









M. Biemuller, M.D. 



A. Pike, M.D. 




A. Schmitt, M.D. 



M. Dratman, M.D. 




L. Lanson, M.D. 



28 




L. Vardaro, M.D. M. ClifTord, M.D. 





L. Roberts, M.D. 



M. Loveland, M.D. J. Oesterling, Ph.D. 



g 




I 



V ■ 




> H ^^1 Hfi^ I '' 

S. Pitrchart, M.D. V. Pasignajen, M.D. T. Rodrigo, M.D. J Hong, M.D. 







D. Brooks, M.D. 




C. Floro, M.D. A. Pakravan, M.D. 




J. Kerns, R.N. 



Apgar 10 



Waiting is the name of the game- 






Father waits- 



Mother waits- 



The Junior waits — It's worth it! 



29 







RADIOLOGY 



The tools of diagnostic roentgenology which fifty years 
ago were crude and simple have become bewilderingly 
complicated and diversified. Fortunately for the medi- 
cal student, enlightened utilization of the medical evi- 
dence obtainable through x-ray diagnosis need only to 
be done by specialists such as shown on this page. 
From distinct black and white to off-shades of grey 
they read beautifully colored descriptions of various 
diseases. 



Eva Fox, M.D., Chairman 




E. Mapp, M.D 




P. Zekavat, M.D. 




F. Rachofsky, M.D. 





Why can't a gynecologist 
do breast biopsies? 



Of course it was 
a rough night! 






What do you mean 
calling that uterus a "B"? 





What's a nice girl like 
you doing in medicine? 




Motherhood and medicine 
do mix! 



Miss O.R.— 1969 



What if he asks us 
to suture? 



I found one with 
noP.I.D.!! 



30 



A 



4 %l 





• 


/> 






PEDIATRICS 



31 






E. Hutchins, M.D. 



R. Hammond, M.D. 





Doris Howell, M.D., Chairman 



A. Ramos, M.D. 



H. Arey, M.D. 







L. Winston, M.D. 



R. Scott, M.D. 



A. Sanmarco, M.D. 



H. Schrom, M.D. 





D. Huff, M.D. 



"In order to understand the activities 
and reactions of a child, the pediatrician 
must have or acquire: Patience; Faith in 
the ability of the child to solve his own 
problems; and Ability to see the problem 
through the child's own eyes." — Nelson 



32 




A. Tin, M.D. 





L. Correa, M.D. 




M. Tin, M.D. 





Patience 



M. Huang, M.D. 



Faith 



N. Jafarian, M.D. 



Ability 



Y. Thataneyakul, M.D. 




33 



SURGERY AND ANESTHESIA 




"No one can be a good physician who has no idea of 
surgical operations, and a surgeon is nothing if 
ignorant of medicine." (Lanfranchi). And also one 
must have an idea of how to hold retractors, dodge 
elbows, be on the scene yet not see anything and how 
not to be flustered when you get an opportunity to tie 
a knot in the suture. 





Donald Cooper, M.D., Chairman 



J. Bassett, M.D. 



A. Morani, M.D. 





H. Thomas, M.D. 



J. Overleese, M.D. 



B. Sigel, M.D. 



A. Brady, M.D. 




W. Green, M.D. 



D. Wagner, M.D. 





G. Nachod, M.D. 



H. Forster, M.D. 





■o 




i 



D. Schem, M.D. 



J. Boland, M.D. 



L. Karafin, M.D. 



R. Kendall, M.D. 



34 




w^ ! 



it 







J. Erickson, M.D. 



A. Brenman, M.D. 




V. Lautz, M.D. 



C. Rojer, M.D. 



J. Tillman, M.D. 




C. Lee, M.D. 



S. Bansal, M.D. 



L. Gunther, M.D. 




M. Riviello, M.D. 




ss 



D. Gallagher, M.D. R. Bockel, M.D. 




C. Landow. M.D. 





M. Montamedi, M.D. 




M. Saeed, M.D. 



R. Richards, M.D. 



R. Rana. M.D. 



N. Cambello, R.N. 



35 



FRESHMAN--CLASS OF 1972 



DEAR MOTHER: 

WELL, I'VE BEEN A MEDICAL STUDENT FOR A FEW 
WEEKS NOW AND I'M KEEPING MY PROMISE TO 
WRITE YOU. MY INTRODUCTION TO WMC CON- 
SISTED OF THREE GLORIOUS DAYS OF ORIENTA- 
TION. FIRST, THERE WAS AN ALL-DAY EXAMINA- 
TION, ON MEDICINE AND SURGERY, YET! THEN 
REGISTRATION, CONFUSION, PICTURE-TAKING, 
MORE CONFUSION, HUGE BOOK LISTS, AND MORE 
CONFUSION. AND OF COURSE, THE HIGH-LIGHT OF 
ORIENTATION— THE THOROUGH PHYSICAL EXAM 
GIVEN IN THE STUDENT HEALTH WHICH IS THAT 
LITTLE BUILDING WITH SO MANY WINDOWS OVER- 
LOOKING THE SIDEWALK AND THE GENERAL PUB- 
LIC. FINALLY, ARMED WITH FIVE BOOKS IN ONE 
HAND AND A MICROSCOPE IN THE OTHER, WE 
TOOK UP RESIDENCE ON THE FOURTH FLOOR. 
THERE, WE FOUND OUR "GUIDING LIGHTS" TO BE 
THE DEPARTMENTS OF BIOCHEMISTRY, ANATOMY, 
PHYSIOLOGY AND PSYCHIATRY. THE DEMONSTRA- 
TIVE MEMBERS OF THESE DEPARTMENTS PRESENT 
THEIR LECTURES WITH BACKGROUND MUSIC AND 
ACCOMPANIMENT PROVIDED BY JACKHAMMERS 
AND DRILLS DOWN THE HALL AND THE DISH- 
WASHER ACROSS THE HALL. WONDER WHY THEY 
DON'T MAKE NOISE WHEN THERE ISN'T A LEC- 
TURE? 

WE HAVE LEARNED THAT THE FRESHMAN YEAR 
CONSISTS MAINLY OF PATHWAYS. THERE ARE 
METABOLIC, NERVOUS, VASCULAR AND HORMONAL 
PATHWAYS. EVERYTHING WE HAVE STUDIED HAS A 
PATHWAY— E. COLI, RATS, CATS, RABBITS, GUINEA 
PIGS, CHICKENS, MICE; HAMSTERS, MONKEYS, 
BIRDS, AND FROGS. I DON'T KNOW ABOUT PEOPLE 



—WE HAVEN'T STUDIED THEM YET. AND OF 
COURSE EVERYTHING THAT HAS A PATHWAY HAS 
A CONTROL. IT SEEMS AS THOUGH EVERYTHING IN 
THE UNIVERSE HAS SOME SORT OF CONTROL. 
EVERYTHING THAT IS, EXCEPT OUR LECTURE 
ROOM. IT IS UNIQUE. DURING THE WINTER A GALE 
FORCE WIND BLOWS ACROSS THE LEFT HALF OF 
THE ROOM, AND FRESHMEN WITH EXPOSURE PROB- 
LEMS HAVE BEEN SEEN IN THE ER. MEANWHILE, 
THE PEOPLE ON THE RIGHT HALF OF THE ROOM 
SUFFOCATE FROM THE HEAT. I'VE HEARD THAT IN 
THE FALL AND SPRING THE TEMPERATURE IS 
MORE UNIFORM WITH BOTH SIDES OF THE ROOM 
SUFFOCATING. 

I'M NOT COMPLAINING TOO MUCH, MOM. THERE 
ARE SOME GOOD THINGS. FOR EXAMPLE— WE GET 
COFFEE BREAKS IN THE MORNING. WE GET 10 MIN- 
UTES. IN THAT 10 MINUTES WE HAVE TO FIT IN 5 
MINUTES TO GET TO THE WHAT-NOT SHOP, 15 MIN- 
UTES WAITING IN LINE, 5 MINUTES WAITING FOR 
CHANGE AND ANOTHER 5 MINUTES GOING BACK 
UPSTAIRS. 

IN SUMMARY, MOM, MY DAY ALTERNATES BE- 
TWEEN STUDENT RECEPTIVE APHASIA AND 
TEACHER EXPRESSIVE APHASIA ADDING UP TO 
CEREBRAL INSULTS THAT CAN ONLY LEAD US TO 
THE SECOND YEAR. WE WILL MISS OUR MONDAY 
MORNING TRAUMA HOUR THEN, BUT WE ARE SURE 
THAT THE 2ND YEAR FACULTY CAN COME UP 
WITH SOME ADEQUATE SUBSTITUTES. WE'VE AL- 
READY HEARD ABOUT ROUND-UPS AND NATIONAL 
BOARDS. 

YOUR LOVING DAUGHTER 






Vicki Baii- 



Eva Balash 



Martha Barraclough 






Frances Batzer 



Meredith Bennet 



Linda Birkner 



36 




Barbara Bradford 



Cheryl Diamond 




Cherie Evans 




Joan Fluri 





Sheryl Buckley 




Nina Diliberto 




Lee Finkelstein 




Judith Folkema 





Kathleen Cheong 






Lois Estok 




Bernadette Fiscina 




\ 



Paula Frank 




Donna Freedman 



Ann Gerace 



Judith Gilmore 



37 






Darlene Goldstein 



Judith Golomb 



Kay Graham 






Lani Graham 



Roberta Hamilton 



Barbara Hancock 






Gail Hansen 



Christine Hashimoto 



Carol Hughes 






Wilma Krause 



Judith Johnson (Ramsdell) 



Meriel Lee 






38 



Grace Letton 



Elizabeth Luwisch 



Paula Maguire 






Susan Maturlo 



Anne Mauks 



Catherine McCoy 




Helen Meeks 





Trina Menden 



Rose Miketta 






Mary Miller 



Rose Mohr 



Kathleen Musser 






Joann Nevyas 



Sara Palone 



Linda Papc 






Donna Pruitt 



Joan Rabinowitz 



Jane Reynolds 



39 






Victoria Romeo 



Barbara Ross 



Virginia Sahr 






Alice Savage 



Marjorie Seltzer 



Anne Splete 






Deanna Sprok 



Frances Stewart 



Nancy Stiles 






Bernice Strommer 



JoAnn Ugenti 



Phillipa Wekselblatt 






40 Patricia Wesley 



Genevieve Winarski 



Ellen Zeichner 



SOPHOMORES— CLASS OF 1971 





Lucrezia Aquino 



Genevieve Ashcom 





Joanne Chaharyn 



Sandra Chase 





Andrea Delgado 



Marion Fanning 





Roberta Goldlust 



Martha Grout 



DEAR MOM: 

I KNOW I HAVEN'T WRITTEN MUCH THIS YEAR, BUT 
GOLLY, I HAVEN'T HAD TIME TO BE HUMAN. THOSE 
MICRO LABS TAKE 8 HOURS A DAY AND THEY 
TALK SO FAST IN PATHOLOGY THAT THEY HAVE 
COVERED THE ENTIRE BOOK, WORD FOR WORD. IN 
THE LECTURES, AND WE HAVE JUST REACHED THE 
HALF-WAY MARK IN THE COURSE. WE'VE ONLY 
HAD THREE LECTURES IN PHARM AND ALREADY 
HAVE HAD TO MEMORIZE EVERYTHING ABOUT 





Anna Baranausnas 



Virginia Bolmarcich 




Mary Christenson 




E. Cheryl Cunningham 




Judith Feldman 



Nancy Golden 





Mary Haflin 



Nancy Jermanovich 



1,000 DRUGS. AND THOSE CUTE LITTLE BLACK BAGS 
—WELL. THEY JUST WONT HOLD ALL OUR EQUIP- 
MENT AND LIPSTICK, MAKE-UP AND THOSE EXTRA 
UNMENTIONABLES THAT YOU CAN'T FIND IN THE 
LADIES ROOM. PLEASE DON'T BE SHOCKED. BUT MY 
FIRST PATIENT IN PHYSICAL DIAGNOSIS WAS A 
MAN. I THINK IT WAS A TOSS-UP AS TO WHO WAS 
THF MOST EMBARRASSED. SAY HI TO DAD— TELL 
HIM I NEFD SOME MONEY. LOVE— 



41 






Lorraine King 



Lyn Lederman 



Kathleen Malaney 






Kathleen Maloney 



Judith Marcus 



Margaret McAloon 






Barbara McCormack 



Carol Meeks 



Jeanne Meisler 






Andrea Mestel 



Susan Miller 



Doris Minasian 






42 Kathleen Mirante 



Nina Morse 



Denise Mulvihill 






Christine Quinn 



Julia Ricking 



Dolores Rodriguez 






Barbara Salago 



Mindy Sanders 



Natalie Shemonsky 






Suzanne Smith 



Melody Stancil 



Wendy Sterne 






Lucille Taverna 



Alice Uong 



Kathleen VanAalten 






Carol Weed 



Mary Welsh 



Claire Weston 



43 




JUNIORS— CLASS OF 1970 

DEAR MOM: 

GOLLY, THE CLINICAL YEARS ARE A LOT MORE FUN THAN THE FIRST TWO. 
JUST THINK, REAL LIVE PATIENTS! THOSE HISTORIES AND PHYSICALS SURE 
TAKE A LOT OF TIME. THE PATIENTS ARE NICE MOST OF THE TIME CONSID- 
ERING THAT I GET TO SEE THEM AFTER THE ATTENDING, THE RESIDENT 
AND THE SENIOR AND THE PATIENT USUALLY ENDS UP BY TELLING ME THE 
QUESTIONS I'VE FORGOTTEN TO ASK. SURGERY IS NOT AS MUCH FUN AS I 
THOUGHT IT WOULD BE, BUT MAYBE NEXT YEAR ILL GET TO SEE THE 
PROCEDURE. SO FAR, ALL I'VE DONE IS DUCK ELBOWS AND HOLD RETRAC- 
TORS. TELL DAD HELLO AND ASK HIM TO PLEASE SEND SOME MONEY. 
LOVE— 



Ricarda Baum 







Eileen Bazelow 



Kristine Bostrom 



Susan Bray 



Lynn Burkes 







Marylou Buyse 



Barbara Carson 



Patricia Conrad 



Lourdes Corman 





Bernadette DeArmond 



M 

Fran Durocher 




Carol Felton 



Mary Guthrie 






Sue Harwood 



Carole Hatayama 



Joan Hurlock 




44 





Gwen Kunken 



Carol Lake 



Gina Lopez 



Sandra Mann 





Bonnie Marshall 



\ 1 

Margitta Maurer 





Susan McLeer 



Ida Newton 





Rose Recco 



Henrietta Rosenberu 



Maria Ross 



Barbara Schindler 








Gertrude Scott 



Claire Siu 





Catherine Sladowsky 



Jane Smedbeck 



45 





CANDID CASUALS 



Barbara Starrett 




Susan Streichenwein 



Mollie Turpin 



f A 


&MK^^ 


H 


} <# if 




r JP 




«*- jt 




Winona Wales 



Wendy Weinstock 




Marilyn Witherup 



Marsha Wolfson 




-'^m. £t ' 






/ 




Lunch Time — Dr. Estes, Dr. Brooks, Mrs. Wade, R.N. 




Rest Time — Dr. Vogel. 



Reiko Yamasaki 



Kathleen Zaremba 




Part Time — Dr. Richards, Dr. Nody, Dr. Riviello. 



46 




Drs. Pike & Forest — "OR caps are a disaster." 



"Smiling now, wait till they go in." (Ross, Rosen. Shelford) 




■ -^ Id id 

Dr. Guy, N. Madden, R.N. — "Magic Potion." 



L. Head — "Lunch-hour lecture." 



47 



A SURGICAL 





1 — Going for the patient. 



2 — Scrubbing. 




5 — Gentle Reassurance. 



6 — Instruments ready. 




a< '-'. 






9 — Gentle retraction. 



10 — Specimen out. 



48 





3 — Anesthesia ready. 



4 — Lights in position. 




7 — Personnel ready. 



8 — The incision. 




11 — Recovery room. 



12 — Operative note written. 



49 




Pick up and delivery. 




The eyes have it! 





Not there — here! 



Mirror, Mirror on the wall. 





Clinics can be fun! 



My darling writes every day! 



50 




It can't be that bad! 



Oh, my aching back! 




& ; r* 



Job hunting' 






IS A NO-NO 



No comment. 




Presenting. 



For Sale — slightly used. 



51 



WE REST . . . 




PARTY-TALK . . 

i 






52 



AND DANCE 

WHENEVER 

WE CAN 








53 



WE GET PAGED 





This is Dr. Brooks. 



This is Dr. Urbach. 





Dr. Rojer here. 



Dr. Ramos speaking. 





This is Dr. Gallagher. 



Dr. Meadows here 




Dr. Roberts speaking. 



54 




Marsha Smith in India. 



Dog lab for Juniors. 




Dr. Brooks in Surgery. 



Dr. Erickson preparing an anesthetic. 




Dr. Vardaro in Surgery. 



Dr. Sanmarco drawine blood. 



55 




Dr. Carrington 



Dr. Howell 




THEY INSTRUCT 



Dr. Schmitt 






Dr. Kendall 



Dr. Biemuller 



56 




Dr. Roberts 



Dr. Adams 



AND COUNSEL 




Dr. Thomas 




Dr. Zekavat 



Dr. Eskin 



57 



SUSTAINING PATRONS 



Arnold Brenman, M.D. 

Mr. and Mrs. James Clinton Cunningham 

Jean L. Forest, M.D. 

Jean Gowing, M.D. 

Dr. Joseph and Elizabeth Head 

Lester Karaffin, M.D. 

Richard Kendall, M.D. 

June Klinghoffer, M.D. 

Goldie and Joseph Lederman 

Jane M. Liebfried, M.D. 

Dr. and Mrs. Louis Nody 

Dr. and Mrs. Samuel Sherman 

Maurice Sones, M.D. 

P. C. and Alice Tan 

Howard Vogel, M.D. 



58 



SENIORS 



CLASS OF 



1969 




SISTER ELLEN MARIE ANDERSON 

University of Delaware 
Villanova, Pennsylvania 



60 




T - 



61 




KAY D. ANDERSON 

B.A., Northwestern University 

Lincolnwood, Illinois 



62 




63 




DOROTHY M. BAUMAN 

B.A., Thiel College 

New Kensington, Pennsylvania 



64 




65 




ILENA BLICKER 

A.B., Temple University 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 



66 




67 




VIVIAN S. BLOTNICK 

B.S., State University, College of Education, Cortland, N.Y. 

Long Beach, New York 



68 




JULIE A. BOTVIN 

University of London, London, England 

Middlesex Hospital Medical School 

McGuire A.F.B., New Jersey 



70 




71 




LINDA S. CAHILL 

A.B., Barnard College, Columbia University 

Brooklyn, New York 



72 




73 




CLAIRE M. CANTERA 

S.B., Simmons College 
Santa Monica, California 



74 




75 




ELAINE H. COHEN 

A.B., Connecticut College 

Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 



76 




77 




NANCY COYNE 

B.A., The City College of New York 

New York, New York 



78 




79 




JOANNE DOMSON 

Immaculata College 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 



80 




81 




MARIE E. DORIA 

A.B., Hunter College of the City University of New York 

Bellerose, Long Island, New York 



82 











83 




SALLY EMERINE 

B.A., Sacramento State College 

Sacramento, California 



84 




S5 




BEVERLY ANNE ESTES 

B.S., Oklahoma State University 

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 



86 




87 




PATRICIA L. FAHRNEY 

B.A., Reed College 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 




89 




JUDITH C. FALLON 

A.B., Regis College 

West Roxbury, Massachusetts 



90 










91 




JEANNE M. FASTOOK 

B.S., Marymount Manhattan College 
Brooklyn, New York 



92 










93 




JACQUELINE BERGDOLL FREY 

B.S., The Pennsylvania State University 

Coopersburg, Pennsylvania 



94 




95 




MARGARET R. GALLAGHER 

B.S., University of Cincinnati 

M.S., Ph.D., Fordham University 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 



96 




97 




ANTOINETTE S. GOMES 

B.S., University of California, Riverside 

Los Angeles, California 



OS 




99 




POLLY ANDERSON GRAHAM 

A.B., Oberlin College 

A.M., University of Chicago 

Cherry Hill, New Jersey 



100 




101 




JUDITH A. HASCHAK 

A.B., Temple University 

Conemaugh, Pennsylvania 



102 




103 




LILLA T. HEAD 

B.A., The College of Wooster 

Syracuse, New York 



104 




105 




JOAN HOLOHAN HOWANITZ 

A.B., Syracuse University 

Schenectady, New York 



106 




107 




MOIRA HURLEY 

B.S., Chestnut Hill College 

Rockville, Maryland 



108 




109 




JOHANNA M. DEL'RE KALEMBA 

A.B., Newark College, Rutgers University 

Lodi, New Jersey 



110 




Ill 




BETTY KLEIMAN 

B.S., State University College, New Paltz, New York 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 



12 




113 




JACQUELINE KUTCHER 

B.A., Queens College 

Bayside, New York 



114 




115 




LORETTE M. LABATAILLE 

B.A., University of California 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 



116 




117 




PATRICIA LAICHA 
B.S., Ursinus College 
Cleona, Pennsylvania 



118 




k 





r 






/ 



4v 




SHIRLEY A. LEVINE 

A.B., Douglas College, Rutgers University 

Wayne, New Jersey 



120 




121 




FRANCENE R. MARGOLIN 

A.B., Temple University 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 



122 




123 




SHEILA MARGOLIS 

B.S., Brooklyn College 

Brooklyn, New York 



124 




125 




KATHLEEN S. MAUKS 

B.A., Danbury State College 

Danbury, Connecticut 



126 




127 




ANNA T. MEADOWS 

B.A., Queens College 

M.A., New York University 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 



128 




129 




SHEILA ANN MURPHEY 
B.A., Chestnut Hill College 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 



130 




13 




AGATHA C. NODY 

A.B., Hunter College of the City University of New York 

Peekskill, New York 



132 




m 




ELEANOR L. NOON 

B.A., St. John's College 
Annapolis, Maryland 



134 




135 




HAZELINE M. NURSE 

A.B., Hunter College of the City University of New York 

Demerara, British Guiana, South America 



136 




137 




LUCILLE A. PAPILE 

A.B., Albertus Magnus College 
Quincy, Massachusetts 



138 




139 




HANNAH H. PEAVY 

B.A., Queens College 

Forest Hills, New York 



140 




141 




BLAIRANNE HOOVER REVAK 

A.B., Susquehanna University 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 



142 




• 



m 




JO BERNICE ROSEN 

B.A., University of Pennsylvania 

Plainview, New York 



144 




145 




MARILYN ROSS 

A.B., Barnard College, Columbia University 

New York, New York 



146 




147 




GAYLE BUCKLEY RUDICK 

B.A., University of Massachusetts 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 



148 





h^^^S 


f ^^*l^^r 


^^^^ M 


r^ 


w 


w £z*~ 






* § '*$i 






i 


1 


\ 


fc/ 


1 


\ 


,"^W 


1 


*N> — . «»,<4fl 



149 




MARY S. RUSSIN 
A.B., Wilkes College 
Plains, Pennsylvania 



150 




151 




PATRICIA SAIGO 

A.B., Barnard College, Columbia University 

Hollis, New York 



152 




153 




JUDITH L. SALZ 

A.B., Barnard College, Columbia University 

New York, New York 



154 




155 




LAURA STAR SBARRA 

B.S., Cornell University 

Hollis, New York 



156 




157 




JOAN SCHMUGLER 

B.A., Brooklyn College 

Brooklyn, New York 



158 




159 




SHEILA A. SHANAHAN 

A.B., Trinity College 
Greenwich, Connecticut 



160 




161 




EDWINA SHELFORD 

B.S., George Washington University 

Washington, D.C. 



162 




163 




MARSHA SMITH 

A.B., Douglas College, Rutgers University 

Burlington, New Jersey 



164 




165 




PATRICIA A. SMITH 

B.A., M.A., Southern Illinois University 

Ridgway, Illinois 



166 




167 




ANNETTE R. STOESSER 

B.A., University of California, Santa Barbara 

Carmel, California 



168 




169 




JULIA TANN 
A.B., Wilson College 
Princeton, New Jersey 



170 




171 




ANN C. VOGEL 

B.A., M.A., University of Minnesota 

New Ulm, Minnesota 



172 




173 



PATRONS 


Marie Kirber, Ph.D. 


Faye Adams, M.D. 


Mr. & Mrs. Hartung Kuhlenbeck 


Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Amarino 


Dr. and Mrs. Samuel Lake 


Mr. & Mrs. Ivar Anderson 


Dr. & Mrs. Glenn Leymaster 


Dr. & Mrs. Leo Baum 


Mr. & Mrs. Louis Lipschitz 


B. Behrend, M.D. 


Leo Madow, M.D. 


E. Cooper Bell, M.D. 


Dr. & Mrs. Edward Masaro 


Martha Biemuller, M.D. 




Nathan and Matilda Blicker 


Mr. & Mrs. E. Maurer 






Hyman Blotnick 


Mr. & Mrs. Cornelius McAloon 






Anna M. Brady, M.D. 


Mr. & Mrs. M. Minasias 






Mr. & Mrs. A. Burkes 


Mrs. William Murphey 






Elsie Carrington, M.D. 


Joanne Overleese, M.D. 






Mr. & Mrs. John Carson 


Mary Dewitt Pettitt, M.D. 






S. Clive Cohen 


Anna H. Pike, M.D. 






Beaufort Cooper, M.D. 


H. Phelps Potter, M.D. 






Donald Cooper, M.D. 


Mary McKee Porter, M.D. 






Joseph & Jessica David 


Joshua & Guita Rosen 






Mr. & Mrs. Dinkelacker 


Mr. & Mrs. Simon Sandors 






Dr. & Mrs. Armand Durocher 


Wm. Sembrot, M.D. 






Regina M. Downie, M.D. 


Mrs. Violet Smadbeck 






Dr. & Mrs. Marvin Dunn 


Mr. & Mrs. Sydney Star 


James C. Erickson, M.D. 


Loring E. Sylvester 


Eva Fox, M.D. 


Carmen Thomas, M.D. Sc.D. 


Carlton and Ruth Frellson 


Phillip Trommer, M.D. 


Dr. & Mrs. Gregory Froio 


D.D. & Lily Uong 


Theodore J. Golden 


JohnUrbach, M.D. 


Mr. & Mrs. N. Hatayama 


Elizabeth Waugh, M.D. 


Theodore F. Hawkins, M.D. 


Esther Weye 


Mary Holderman 


William & Inge Wolf 


Mr. & Mrs. Alexander Inselman 


Alma Young, M.D. 


Margaret Kelly 



174 



CONGRATULATIONS GRADUATES 
COMPLIMENTS OF 

NATIONAL ACADEMIC 
CAP & GOWN CO. 



82 1 - 823 Arch Street 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19107 



FOR ALL YOUR PHOTOGRAPHY NEEDS 



GERMANTOWN CAMERA CENTER 




GE 8-4466 



5733 Germantown Avenue • Philadelphia. Pa. 19144 



Today More and More 

The Search is for Quality 

Today More and More 

People are Banking 

At Provident 

PROVIDENT 
NATIONAL BANK 



Germantown Office 



150 W. Chelton Ave. 



The Quality Bank for Quality People 
Member FDIC 



MARION AND HENRY 



HAIRDRESSING 



8144 Germantown Avenue 

Philadelphia. Pa. 

CHestnut Hill 7-3817 



175 



AVAILABLE JULY 1, 1969: 12 Rotating Internships, AMA approved, 300-bed 
general hospital located one block from and affiliated with the Johns Hopkins Hos- 
pital. High quality training in carefully organized programs under a distinguished 
faculty. Salary $6,000.00 yr. ECFMG certification necessary. For complete infor- 
mation contact: Director of Medical Education, Church Home and Hospital, 100 N. 
Broadway, Baltimore, Md. 21231 or call 301-732-4730 Ext. 452. 



The Management of the 

WHAT-NOT-SHOPPE 

of Woman's Medical College 

Extends 

Heartiest Congratulations to the Class of 1969 



Prescription Security-Safe for it! 




128 W. Chelton Ave. 



Philadelphia, Pa. 19144 



BLOCKS SHOES 

23 Maplewood Ave. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 19144 



176 



JOHNSON & PRINCE 

INC 

Offset Reproduction + Cold Type Composition if Sequecard Systems jr Mailing 

214 South 12th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 19107 
215-PE 5-1717 



THE INN AT ALDEN PARK 

Matthew DiBello, Mgr. 
School House La. & Wissahickon Philadelphia, Pa. 19144 



177 



BEST WISHES 

from 



A. M. w. A. 

The Official Representative 

of 

Women in Medicine 

We Invite All Women Physicians to Help 

Formulate and Execute Our Policies. 

Are You a Member? 



For Membership Information Please Write to: 

American Medical Women's Association, Inc. 
1 740 Broadway New York, New York 1 00 1 9 



!78 



Dedicated to the continued advancement of health through 
drug research 

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FORT WASHINGTON. PA 

PHARMACEUTICAL MANUFACTURERS 



McNEIL ) 



Partners m Mealtkt 

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Pennsylvania Blue Shield 

'Registered service mark of the American Hospital Association 
'Registered service mark of the National Association of Blue Shield Plans 




179 



Compliments of 



KNOLL PHARMACEUTICAL 
COMPANY 



ORANGE, NEW JERSEY 



Serving the medical profession for more than sixty years 



Congratulations 

to the 

Class of 1969 

from 

THE JUNIORS 



ZAMSKY STUDIOS 



1007 Market St. 



Philadelphia, Pa. 19107 



Official Photographer 

for the 

Class of 1969 

Congratulations Seniors 



80 



ST. LUKES HOSPITAL, BETHLEHEM, PENNA. 




500 Beds 

• Rotating Internships, with Majors in Medicine and Surgery. 

• Approved Residencies in General Surgery, Internal 
Medicine, Obstetrics and Gynecology, and Pathology. 

• Full time Chiefs in Medicine and Surgery. 

• Affiliation with Jefferson Medical College and the 
Graduate School of the University of Pennsylvania. 

• Excellent stipend with full perquisites. 

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, WRITE OR CALL COLLECT 

Michael L. Sheppeck, M.D., Medical Director 
St. Luke's Hospital, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18015 



181 



Congratulations Class of 1969 



THE WMC 

ALUMNAE 

ASSOCIATION 



Warmly Welcomes You 

The 1 17th Graduating Class 

Into Active Membership 



Best Wishes to Each of You 




182 



George Robertson 
& Sons, Inc. 

Florists — Decorators 

8501 Germantown Avenue 
Philadelphia, Pa. 19118 

CH 2-6000 

AD 3-1849 





183 



THE FRESHMEN 

and 

THE SOPHOMORES 



Congratulate 
The Seniors 



A FRIEND 



PEACE 



184 




Ann Preston, M.D. 
Dean 1866-1872 



Emeline Cleveland, M.D. 



Dean 1872-1874 





E. Bartholomew Fussell, M.D. 



Dean 1856-1866 



Elwooil Harvey, M.D. Dean 1855-1856 
David Johnson, M.D. Dean 1852-1855 




James F. X. McCloskey, M.D. 



Dean 1850-1851 



No Photographs 
available of 
these Deans. 



N. R. Mosely, M.D. 
Dean 1851-1852